When to visit the home churches during Easter (Seville)

easter seville

The religious period known as the Semana Santa is the week before Easter. Seville comes alive during the Holy Week, when all sorts of events take place and more particularly the processions.

The Cathedral and Giralda Tower are closed to visitors in the afternoon during Semana Santa.

Secure your visit getting your skip-the-line tickets in advance! You’ll access the Cathedral, the Giralda and the Iglesia del Salvador.

But since most of the processions start in the afternoon only to end late at night, you can spend your mornings visiting the home churches of some of the brotherhoods that will parade later that day.

However, be patient throughout Easter. Seville will be full of people everywhere, most of the time.

5 reasons to visit the home churches in Easter (Seville)

  1. You can see in a quiet way and with plenty of time the floats (pasos) just prepared for their departure, which means that the fresh flower ornaments are already in place.
  2. You have the chance to contemplate the magnificent altar of insignias and the works of art that many churches treasure.
  3. You have as long as you like to take pictures!
  4. Even if there’s a lot of people inside, it will always be less crowded than out in the streets during the procession.
  5. If it rains and the procession is cancelled, the brotherhood usually open its home church during the afternoon so visitors can go and admire the pasos. It’s your only chance to see them since the won’t go out in the streets (ie. once a brotherhood cancels its procession, they’ll have to wait until the year after to try and go out again).

To avoid the crowds that gather in the home churches of the most popular brotherhoods, it’s best to visit these churches early in the morning (before 10:30).

As the morning goes by, you’ll encounter more and more people inside the churches, particularly from 11:30 onwards.

Easter Seville home churches map

To help you navigate throughout the narrow streets of Seville, I’ve put up a map including all the brotherhoods’ home churches that you can visit during Holy Week.

To easily identify them, I’ve tagged them using a color code according to the day the brotherhood goes on procession.

You can click on the map to have a full screen view, see the legend on the left hand side or zoom in and out.

Domingo de Ramos (Palm Sunday)

In all these churches the Mass of the Palms is celebrated with great solemnity. Therefore, I recommend you to visit them before noon and avoid the first hours of the afternoon, because they’ll be very crowded.

  • Go to the Iglesia del Salvador where you can see both La Borriquita (1 paso) and El Amor (2 pasos). Pasión (2 pasos) is also hosted here, but the brotherhood usually spends Monday and Tuesday to finish the floats’ preparations.
  • Visit the Iglesia de San Juan de la Palma where La Amargura (2 pasos) is displayed.
  • At the Iglesia de los Terceros you can see the impressive La Cena (3 pasos).
  • Head to the Parroquia de San Roque to have a closer look at San Roque (2 pasos).
  • Go to the Capilla del Mayor Dolor where Jesús Despojado (2 paso) is displayed.
  • Visit the the Parroquia de San Julián to see La Hiniesta (2 pasos).
  • Cross the Triana Bridge and head to the Capilla de la Estrella to admire La Estrella (2 pasos).
  • Further away, at the Parroquia de San Sebastián, is La Paz (2 pasos).
  • Alternatively, you can go to the kissing of Gran Poder, in its Basilica in the Plaza de San Lorenzo. There are usually long lines of devotees.

Lunes Santo (Monday)

Easter Monday is characterized by historical brotherhoods that over the years have carried out their procession on different days and other younger ones.

  • Go to the Iglesia de Santiago where you can see La Redención (2 pasos).
  • At the Parroquia de San Andrés you can see the sober Santa Marta (1 paso).
  • Visit the charming Capilla del Dulce Nombre de Jesús where Vera Cruz (2 pasos) is displayed.
  • Head to the Parroquia de San Vicente to have a closer look at Las Penas (2 pasos). You’ll also see the 3 pasos of Las Siete Palabras (probably without any flowers).
  • Next to the Museo de Bellas Artes is the Capilla del Museo where El Museo is displayed (2 pasos).
  • Go to the Capilla del Rosario to see Las Aguas (2 pasos).
  • Cross the Triana Bridge and head to the Parroquia de San Gonzalo to admire San Gonzalo (2 pasos).
  • Outside the city center is the Parroquia de Santa Genoveva where you can see Santa Genoveva (2 pasos).
  • Further away, at the Parroquia de San Ignacio de Loyola, is San Pablo (El Polígono) (2 pasos).

Martes Santo (Tuesday)

Holy Tuesday has been celebrated since 1904 with the Brotherhood of Santa Cruz, dean of the day. Over time, the remaining brotherhoods have joined the list to produce one of the most beautiful days of Holy Week in Seville.

  • Visit the charming Capilla de la Universidad where Los Estudiantes (2 pasos) is displayed.
  • Located in a beautiful square, the Iglesia de San Lorenzo is home to the Dulce Nombre (2 pasos). You may also see the paso of La Soledad de San Lorenzo (probably without any flowers).
  • At the Iglesia de Santa Cruz you can see the sober Santa Cruz (2 pasos).
  • Go to the Iglesia de San Nicolás de Bari where you can see La Candelaria (2 pasos).
  • The old and ancient Omnium Sanctorum hosts Los Javieres (2 pasos).
  • Head to the Iglesia de San Esteban to have a closer look at San Esteban (2 pasos).
  • Outside the city center is the Parroquia de San Benito where you can see San Benito (3 pasos).
  • Further away, at the Parroquia de Nuestra Señora de los Dolores, is El Cerro del Águila (3 pasos).
  • Alternatively, at the Cathedral, the Chrism Mass or Mass of the Holy Sacraments is celebrated, attended by all the priests of the diocese.

Miércoles Santo (Wednesday)

Miércoles Santo is a day when classic brotherhoods mix with others who want to write their brotherhood history through the streets of the city.

  • Visit the charming Capilla de la Piedad where El Baratillo (2 pasos) is displayed.
  • Head to the Convento de San Antonio de Padua to have a closer look at El Buen Fin (2 pasos).
  • At the Parroquia de San Pedro you can see the sober Cristo de Burgos (2 pasos).
  • The small but cozy Capilla de San Andrés is home to Los Panaderos (2 pasos).
  • Head to the Parroquia de San Vicente to have a closer look at Las Siete Palabras (3 pasos). You may still see Las Penas (2 pasos) after its procession on Monday.
  • Go to the Iglesia de San Martín where La Lanzada is displayed (2 pasos).
  • The old and ancient Omnium Sanctorum hosts El Carmen Doloroso (2 pasos). You may still see Los Javieres (2 pasos) after its procession on Tuesday.
  • Outside the city center is the Parroquia de San Bernardo where you can see San Bernardo (2 pasos).
  • Further away, at the Parroquia de la Concepción Inmaculada is La Sed (2 pasos).

Jueves Santo (Thursday) and La Madrugá (Friday morning)

Thursday mornings are always very busy – it’s the only morning you have to visit the home churches of the brotherhoods that go on procession both Thursday afternoon and Friday morning. So you’ll need to make a choice because you won’t have time to see them all.

Tip #1: Spot women and their mantillas

Mantilla is a synonym of Easter. Seville is full of them.

Jueves Santo is the best time to see the city full of women dressed in sober black mid-length dresses, gloves, and kitten-heel pumps.

But you’ll be mostly stroke by their black lace mantillas, which rise dramatically over their chignons before descending, like a shadow, down their backs. These intricate headpieces, native to Spanish culture since the 16th century, are worn by those of faith, symbolizing the veiling of the physical so that the beauty of God can be illuminated.

The best places to spot them are:

  • The Basílica de Nuestra Señora de la Esperanza Macarena that hosts La Macarena (2 pasos).
  • The Basílica de Nuestro Padre Jesús del Gran Poder where you can admire the always impressive El Gran Poder (2 pasos).

Tip #2. Visit the home churches of the brotherhoods you won’t see during La Madrugá

Watching and experiencing La Madrugá is not impossible mission, but it’s not easy.

So, if you don’t manage to see the 6 processions that go on during the night (and part of the next day), seeing the floats fully decorated in their home churches can be a very good alternative.

  • Almost always closed during the rest of the year, visit the Iglesia de San Antonio Abad to admire El Silencio (2 pasos).
  • The magnificent Parroquia de la Magdalena hosts El Calvario (2 pasos). You’ll also see the paso of La Quinta Angustia full of flowers.
  • Head to the Santuario de Nuestro Padre Jesús de la Salud y María Santísima de las Angustias Coronada to have a closer look at Los Gitanos (2 pasos).
  • Cross the Triana Bridge and head to the Capilla de los Marineros to admire La Esperanza de Triana (2 pasos).

Tip #3: Visit the home churches of the Jueves Santo’s brotherhoods

  • Go to the Iglesia del Salvador where you can see Pasión (2 pasos). You may also have the chance to see both La Borriquita (1 paso) and El Amor (2 pasos) after their processions on Sunday.
  • Head to the Parroquia de la Magdalena to have a closer look at La Quinta Angustia (1 paso). You’ll also see the 2 pasos of El Calvario full of flowers.
  • At the Iglesia de la Anunciación you can see the nostalgic El Valle (3 pasos).
  • The old and ancient Iglesia de Santa Catalina hosts La Exaltación (2 pasos).
  • Visit the charming Capilla de Montesión where Montesión (2 pasos) is displayed.
  • In the limits of the city center you’ll find the Capilla de Nuestra Señora de los Ángeles where you can see Los Negritos (2 pasos).
  • Cross the San Telmo Bridge and head to the Capilla de la Fábrica de Tabacos to admire Las Cigarreras (2 pasos).

Tip #4: Go off the beaten path

Throughout the afternoon you can also spend some time visiting the churches of the old city center (many of which are normally closed) because they’ll be specially decorated for the services of the Lord’s Supper.

Alternatively, you can attend the services in a special place, such as a monastery (e.g. San Clemente, Santa Inés, or Santa Paula), or a convent (like Santa Isabel, Santa Ana, Santa Rosalía, or San José).

Viernes Santo (Friday afternoon)

Good Friday is a day where nostalgia for what has been lived is gaining the pulse on what is yet to be unveiled.

Fatigue is taking its toll on the bodies of the brotherhoods, but the quality and the anointing of the 7 brotherhoods of the day are a powerful lure to attend the “call” of the processions.

  • At the Antiguo Convento de la Paz you can see the traditional La Mortaja (1 paso).
  • Go to the Capilla de la Carretería where you can see La Carretería (2 pasos).
  • Head to the Iglesia de San Buenaventura to admire La Soledad (1 paso).
  • Visit the Parroquia de San Isidoro where San Isidoro is displayed (2 pasos).
  • The charming Capilla de Monserrat hosts Montserrat (2 pasos).
  • Cross the Triana Bridge and head to the Parroquia de Nuestra Señora de la O to admire La O (2 pasos).
  • Cross the Cristo de la Expiración Bridge and visit the Basílica del Cristo de la Expiración to have a closer look at El Cachorro (2 pasos).

Throughout the afternoon you can also spend some time visiting the churches of the old city center (many of which are normally closed) because they’ll be specially decorated for the services of the Lord’s Passion.

Alternatively, you can attend the services in a special place, such as the Cathedral (usually at 17:00), a monastery (e.g. San Clemente, Santa Inés, or Santa Paula), or a convent (like Santa Isabel, Santa Ana, Santa Rosalía, or San José).

Sábado Santo (Saturday)

The Holy Week of Seville faces its final stretch with five brotherhoods in the streets and a festive atmosphere that preludes the Resurrection of Christ.

  • The small but cozy Capilla de Nuestra Señora de los Dolores is home to Los Servitas (2 pasos).
  • Located in a beautiful square, the Iglesia de San Lorenzo is home to the La Soledad de San Lorenzo (1 paso). You may also have the chance to see Dulce Nombre (2 pasos) after its procession on Tuesday.
  • Visit the Iglesia de San Gregorio where El Santo Entierro is displayed (3 pasos).
  • In the limits of the city center you’ll find the Basílica de María Auxiliadora where you can see La Trinidad (3 pasos).
  • Further away, at the Parroquia de San Diego de Alcalá is El Sol (2 pasos).

Domingo de Resurrección (Easter)

And finally, it’s Easter! Seville is about to say goodbye to the most important week of the year.

  • As the procession starts early in the morning (8:30), the Iglesia de Santa Marina won’t open to see El Resucitado (2 pasos) unless it’s raining and the procession won’t take place.
  • In the morning, the Easter greeting of the Chapter to the Archbishop is celebrated in the Cathedral. All these celebrations in the Cathedral are presided over by the Archbishop using the best images, fabrics, gold and silver work that the Cathedral has. If you plan to access the Cathedral, make sure you ask for the opening times as the access is restricted.
  • Alternatively, you can go to to Triana for the kissing of
    • El Cristo de la Expiación, popularly called Basílica del Cristo de la Expiración at the the Basílica del Cristo de la Expiración.
    • Nuestro Padre Jesús Nazareno of La O at the Parroquia de Nuestra Señora de la O.

This article is part of a complete tutorial on Semana Santa in Seville where you can read all the information you need to organize your experience during this magical and unique week.

Here is a complete summary of all the guide:

1. Semana Santa dates in Seville
2. What are Seville’s Holy Week processions?
3. Easter activities: daily schedule of Semana Santa processions
4. Holy Week Seville: What to see each day
5. Live Semana Santa in Seville as locals do
6. 9 tips to make the most out of Easter in Seville
7. When to visit the home churches during Easter (Seville)
8. How to survive Holy Week in Seville with children
9. What are the Semana Santa brotherhoods (hermandades)
10. Semana Santa glossary

When to visit the home churches during Easter (Seville)

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